Workshops

Day One 9:45am Sessions

Language and Traditional Ways of the Anishinaabe

 A survey of Aboriginal language teachers in Manitoba brings to light what is needed to assist them in implementing their language programs. The research resulted in a report titled "MALS Survey-Highlights 2015-2016." One recommendation from the research indicates that "the Elders who are the knowledge keepers also play an important role with regard to culture. They can teach future generations about the importance of culture, offer cultural teachings, and conduct ceremonies."(p.13) A power-point presentation will showcase how one can incorporate Ojibwe language with culture and will walk participants through chapter one of Edward Benton-Banai's book titled "The Mishomis Book-The Voice of the Ojibway." The chapter explains how life came to be from an Ojibwe perspective. The power point helps incorporate language and traditional ways of the Anishinaabe. 

Making Language Survival Easy

 By developing strategies to assist fluent speakers to engage and support semi fluent speakers, we build a new generation that will continue language survival. We will show strategies and give advice as to how you may accomplish your language objectives in your community. We will show activities and clips of projects to assist you in your planning. We will also provide an opportunity to discuss best approach to combine the methods of instruction to achieve maximum results. 


Aboriginal Language Literacy

 

In many respects, the written word supersedes the spoken. It is used in preserving history, narratives, agreements, and, it is important to explain concepts in education as well as law. The aboriginal perspective(s) will not be adequately conveyed in another language such as English or French. For instance, the Ojibwe Language can perfectly reflect on the Ojibwe peoples’ perspectives on history, beliefs, values and education, it is imperative for the Ojibwe people to be literate in their language as well as other nations to progress in these constructs, otherwise will not make advances collectively.

Overview

Writing Systems – Current and historically

Alternative Methodologies to Literacy

Culturally-based literacy

Literacy Promotion

Symbology 

Learning Language Through Ceremony

TBA

Button Making Workshop

We are celebrating the Year of Indigenous Languages by showcasing the pride and love we have for our languages and cultures. Come join us during the 3 days in Mapleleaf B room and make your buttons. You can create one from scratch, or we have many templates to choose from. While you're there, enjoy a snack, coffee and conversation.

Indigenous Food Language

  

Indigenous food language is a timely and important response to food insecurity and the loss of language, ceremony, and other impacts related to colonialism. It goes beyond food to ensure that people and the land are connected and that cultural and traditional teachings can guide and protect our food systems. Byron will discuss his understandings of the connections of land-based language in the context of food from an indigenous lens. 


"I no longer see myself torn between two worlds, but rather as a lifeline between them".

Jackson Q. P. Beardy – Garden Hill First Nation 

1944-1984

Day One 1:00pm Sessions

Storytelling

  This workshop introduces participants to The Storytelling Method. We present teaching techniques and advice for Ojibway Language curricula. Participants receive handouts describing techniques, and examples of the language with pictures, Ojibway words and sentences. 

A Storytelling Method Teacher, teaching New Learners uses no English whatsoever, written or spoken.  

This Storytelling workshop has three goals: present the Storytelling technique, explore the concept of Body/Blood memory, and discuss why previous Grammar-based methodologies has not produced fluent speakers. 

We will discuss why it is stated that if methodologies and strategies for Ojibway language revitalization doesn’t change then the Ojibway language will be extinct with three generations.

Strategies To Learn Language, Culture & Traditions

   The language instructors and students will discuss the benefits and challenges of the Ojibwe Language Program offered through New Diretions, Opikihiwawin Language & Culture Program. The program is offered all year long from October to June on Saturdays from 10 am to 12 noon. The instructors and students will present and demonstrate language and cultural learning strategies using music and songs, games and movement activities, and puppets and manipulatives. The aim of the program is for students to learn the Ojibwe/Anishinaabemowin through questions and answers, dialogue and conversations, and hand-on commands and responses using songs, visuals and concrete items. The students also learn to practice literacy skills and have opportunities for reading and writing activities using the double vowel system.  The integration of cultural and knowledge is also integrated into the classes in various ways. Of course, the breakdown of word parts and meanings to reveal cultural meanings are commonly done. There are Elders and guest speakers that are called in to share cultural knowledge. The students smudge, learn drum songs, say a daily gratitude prayer and discuss cultural teachings. The workshop will show a snapshot of varied activities that occur during the language classes and participants will have opportunity to observe, engage in, and ask questions throughout the workshop.   

The National Centre for Collaboration in Indigenous Education and Languages

National Centre for Collaboration in Indigenous Education(NCCIE) research connects communities with each other to share their stories about Indigenous education across Canada and around the world. One of the core messages heard during NCCIE's first year is how important languages are to First Nations, Métis and Inuit Peoples and the central role languages play when passing on knowledge and culture through Indigenous education. To reflect this close relationship between Indigenous languages and Indigenous education, and in support of the United Nations Declaration that 2019 is the 'Year of Indigenous Languages', NCCIE has initiated a number of language projects. Going into its second year, NCCIE contemplated how to better represent Indigenous languages and have more Indigenous languages heard on the website. This pilot project, the 10X10 Indigenous Language Initiative, has been created as a result. We look forward to the opportunity to share some examples and discuss the future of Indigenous education with a focus on language in our workshop.

Issues in Native Language Teaching

 This session will discuss the factures which enhance native language teaching. The session will deal with some of the required conditions that need to be in place, and the practices which make native language teaching credible and rewarding for both the teacher and learner. 

Button Making Workshop

 We are celebrating the Year of Indigenous Languages by showcasing the pride and love we have for our languages and cultures. Come join us during the 3 days in Mapleleaf B room and make your buttons. You can create one from scratch, or we have many templates to choose from. While you're there, enjoy a snack, coffee and conversation. 

Day One 2:45pm Sessions

Overcoming Barriers

 In this interactive workshop, Grace and Joyce will attempt to capture the barriers associated with non indigenous people that work in all the systems, bring in own language and culture into the workplace and how that effects the indigenous people in those systems. A brief introduction about Indigenous world view and the connection to the land will lay the foundation for an exercise about identifying barriers within the justice, CFS, health and education fields, what is inhibiting the progress, and how can we work together to overcome them.  

LRSD Circle of Life Ojibwe Language and Culture Exposure Program

  This presentation will focus on how we created an early years nature and play-based Ojibwe Language Exposure Program based on the Circle of Life and the Tipi Framework  Model, for the Louis Riel School Division here in Winnipeg. 

We often use the outdoors in our language program, and have ideas and tips around that. Like you, we make a lot of our own  resources and can bring/share what that looks like. We have a staff of five Teachers and Instructors and we serve around 1000 students and staff.  We have learned a lot since starting to develop the program in 2016, both the students and the teachers have told us whats working and whats not, and we've created a plan for improvements . We always want to improve our teaching practice."  

Ojibwe Language Games

Join Dawnis Kennedy and Virginia Pateman others from the Manitoba Indigenous Cultural Education Centre (MICEC) as they debut their forthcoming publications and language learning games. The Boogidi Book is a fun and silly story that encourages empathy and supports young children learning personal pronouns, verb conjugation, simple sentences and exclamations. The Boogidi Game is an interactive card game that drills players on conjugation, allowing them to power up their Ojibwe exponentially. Players learn 100 sentences and 43 conjugation patterns about farting (these patterns also transform other verbs into 80 different sentences too). Gidinwewin and Kitininímowin provide the inspiration for these and several other language games currently in development at MICEC. 

An Indigenous Research Collection at the Manitoba Museum

 This talk is about the Indigenous Scholars in Residence program at the Manitoba Museum.  This program, now  five years old, enables graduate students at any Manitoba University to make use of the museum's collections to enhance and broaden their research and engage with their material heritage.  Students in Native Studies, Fine Arts, Archival and Library Sciences, Curatorial Studies, History, and Law have come to the museum and discovered collections which enabled their research or increased their understanding of the emotional and aesthetic values of the people of the past. This academic work has made the Museum's collection more relevant to Indigenous scholars and of the ten university students who have been a part of the program, five have successfully completed their degrees and three more are in their final year 

Button Making Workshop

 We are celebrating the Year of Indigenous Languages by showcasing the pride and love we have for our languages and cultures. Come join us during the 3 days in Mapleleaf B room and make your buttons. You can create one from scratch, or we have many templates to choose from. While you're there, enjoy a snack, coffee and conversation. 

Day Two Mother's Lodges

 

Our Mother’s Lodge’s are a home away from home. During these sessions, participants are encouraged to visit one or all of the language lodges, and enjoy some coffee or tea and a snack with the Grandmother’s. This is a great space for learning, sharing stories, and enjoying time together.



Day Two 9:30am Sessions

Ojibwe Mother's Lodge

Mary Courchene

Ojibwe-Cree Mother's Lodge

Nelliane Cromarty

Button Making Workshop

 We are celebrating the Year of Indigenous Languages by showcasing the pride and love we have for our languages and cultures. Come join us during the 3 days in Mapleleaf B room and make your buttons. You can create one from scratch, or we have many templates to choose from. While you're there, enjoy a snack, coffee and conversation. 

Day Two 10:45am Sessions

Ojibwe Mother's Lodge

Mary Courchene

Ojibwe-Cree Mother's Lodge

Nelianne Cromarty

Learn in Beauty: Total Physical Response

  2019 is recognized as the International Year of the Indigenous Languages. In today’ language talks, we are seeing an important shift in language efforts happening in our communities. We hear our Denesųłįne Yatie being spoken in cultural events throughout the year. Seasonal culture camps are held to help with language. We are trying to help the young children in understanding the way of our people, as this will lead them into Hoųzų Eghenaí.

At this workshop, the presenter will share language learning strategies when applying Total Physical Response to teach conversational skills, for everyday language. TPR is one of the language revitalization models in teaching second language acquisition. We will demonstrate how to create language scripts, as this is the basis for teaching Total Physical Response  

Button Making Workshop

 We are celebrating the Year of Indigenous Languages by showcasing the pride and love we have for our languages and cultures. Come join us during the 3 days in Mapleleaf B room and make your buttons. You can create one from scratch, or we have many templates to choose from. While you're there, enjoy a snack, coffee and conversation. 

Day Two 1:00pm Sessions

Cree Mother's Lodge

Stella Neff

Dene Mother's Lodge

Agnes Carlson

Dakota Mother's Lodge

Linda Eastman

Games to Reconnect to Your Ancestral Language

  Games are used to promote Indigenous languages, and can introduce historical information. This workshop features a variety of games you will learn that will be accompanied by instructional parts and items needed for your classroom. You will learn how to adapt these games, and how these games can help the children reconnect to their languages.

Strategies to Learn Language, Culture & Traditions

 The language instructors and students will discuss the benefits and challenges of the Ojibwe Language Program offered through New Diretions, Opikihiwawin Language & Culture Program. The program is offered all year long from October to June on Saturdays from 10 am to 12 noon. The instructors and students will present and demonstrate language and cultural learning strategies using music and songs, games and movement activities, and puppets and manipulatives. The aim of the program is for students to learn the Ojibwe/Anishinaabemowin through questions and answers, dialogue and conversations, and hand-on commands and responses using songs, visuals and concrete items. The students also learn to practice literacy skills and have opportunities for reading and writing activities using the double vowel system.  The integration of cultural and knowledge is also integrated into the classes in various ways. Of course, the breakdown of word parts and meanings to reveal cultural meanings are commonly done. There are Elders and guest speakers that are called in to share cultural knowledge. The students smudge, learn drum songs, say a daily gratitude prayer and discuss cultural teachings. The workshop will show a snapshot of varied activities that occur during the language classes and participants will have opportunity to observe, engage in, and ask questions throughout the workshop. 

Day Two 2:45pm Sessions

Cree Mother's Lodge

Stella Neff

Dene Mother's Lodge

Agnes Carlson

Dakota Mother's Lodge

Linda Eastman

Storytelling

  This workshop introduces participants to The Storytelling Method. We present teaching techniques and advice for Ojibway Language curricula. Participants receive handouts describing techniques, and examples of the language with pictures, Ojibway words and sentences. 

A Storytelling Method Teacher, teaching New Learners uses no English whatsoever, written or spoken.  

This Storytelling workshop has three goals: present the Storytelling technique, explore the concept of Body/Blood memory, and discuss why previous Grammar-based methodologies has not produced fluent speakers. 

We will discuss why it is stated that if methodologies and strategies for Ojibway language revitalization doesn’t change then the Ojibway language will be extinct with three generations.

Button Making Workshop

 We are celebrating the Year of Indigenous Languages by showcasing the pride and love we have for our languages and cultures. Come join us during the 3 days in Mapleleaf B room and make your buttons. You can create one from scratch, or we have many templates to choose from. While you're there, enjoy a snack, coffee and conversation. 

Day Three 10:30am Sessions

Anishinaabe Language & Culture Acquisition

  A discussion and focus on methodology, instructional approaches and learning how to incorporate and acquire language and culture acquisition for your community and school. The presentation will emphasis on the challenges & barriers teachers, linguists and fluent speakers of the community will encounter. Examples, dialogues, and demonstrations of each topic area will be shared as well as a question and answer sharing period.

Grassroots Language Teaching

  

A fluent person can teach his/her family members and friends without teaching grammar or spelling. The course outline enables the students to learn useful conversations as long as they keep coming to class. 

Successful Language Teaching Strategies

 The outcome is to have our new leaners begin to think in their indigenous language. How do we accomplish this objective? Strategize for retention by introducing a multi-faceted approach to language learning. Throughout this workshop, Kevin will be sharing examples of the lessons that he has done and will be explaining how he introduces and shares the language. He will provide an opportunity to experience these examples and show their effectiveness. Included will be storytelling, games, interactive memorization, music, and introduction of culture to support lessons.   

Creating More New Speakers

  

Year Two of the Prairies to Woodlands Master-Apprentice Program for Michif and Other Indigenous Langages

   

The Prairies to Woodlands Indigenous Language Revitalization Circle is presently running a Master-Apprentice Program for Michif and Other Indigenous Languages. The second year of the  pilot project has been funded by the Aboriginal Language Initiative, and the first of two skills workshop has just been completed. 

And, although this pilot project does not have a formal research component, some perspectives and experiences shared by the Indigenous language learners and teachers supports the link between language, health and wellbeing as expressed in the literature.   Of special interest are references to the strengthening and healing of family ties and relationships.

In our presentation, we will give an overview of our project—its challenges, successes and hopes for the future with observations of our participants.  We will also relate how we see the Master (Mentor)-Apprentice program, fitting into the spectrum of community and institutional Indigenous language acquisition and revitalization programs. 

Button Making Workshop

  We are celebrating the Year of Indigenous Languages by showcasing the pride and love we have for our languages and cultures. Come join us during the 3 days in Mapleleaf B room and make your buttons. You can create one from scratch, or we have many templates to choose from. While you're there, enjoy a snack, coffee and conversation.  

Day Three 1:00pm Sessions

Aboriginal Language Literacy

 

In many respects, the written word supersedes the spoken. It is used in preserving history, narratives, agreements, and, it is important to explain concepts in education as well as law. The aboriginal perspective(s) will not be adequately conveyed in another language such as English or French. For instance, the Ojibwe Language can perfectly reflect on the Ojibwe peoples’ perspectives on history, beliefs, values and education, it is imperative for the Ojibwe people to be literate in their language as well as other nations to progress in these constructs, otherwise will not make advances collectively.

Overview

Writing Systems – Current and historically

Alternative Methodologies to Literacy

Culturally-based literacy

Literacy Promotion

Symbology 

Kinatan Aski Akwa Ininimowin

  

The traditional way of life and language of the Kinosewi Sipi ininowak has been impacted by numerous events and activities over several centuries.  Some of the major impacts are the establishment of a trading post during the fur trade era and was a major route for several centuries, the signing of treaty 5, was the site of two Residential Schools and most recent the impacts of water diversions and construction of hydro generating stations by Manitoba Hydro. As part of the reconciliation process, the community has focused on healing through land-based activities, an emphasis on the revitalization of ininimowin, and strengthening identity through Ininiwi Pimatisiwin. 


The session will focus on a number of school based and community based initiatives designed to strengthen relationships, support positive identity, promote healing and to revitalize our ininimowin. 

Language and Traditional Ways of the Anishinaabe

  A survey of Aboriginal language teachers in Manitoba brings to light what is needed to assist them in implementing their language programs. The research resulted in a report titled "MALS Survey-Highlights 2015-2016." One recommendation from the research indicates that "the Elders who are the knowledge keepers also play an important role with regard to culture. They can teach future generations about the importance of culture, offer cultural teachings, and conduct ceremonies."(p.13) A power-point presentation will showcase how one can incorporate Ojibwe language with culture and will walk participants through chapter one of Edward Benton-Banai's book titled "The Mishomis Book-The Voice of the Ojibway." The chapter explains how life came to be from an Ojibwe perspective. The power point helps incorporate language and traditional ways of the Anishinaabe.  

Aboriginal Language Teacher Education Program

  The workshop will run as a two-part session. The first part we will review the objectives and progress of Phase I and II of Manitoba Aboriginal Language Strategy (MALS) Aboriginal Languages Teacher Education Program (ALTEP) project and present how we used various tools and resources to undertake the research, data and development of the reports. The second part will open up discussion to the group with the hope that we can all discuss experiences, successes and challenges related to this type of work.

Button Making Workshop

  We are celebrating the Year of Indigenous Languages by showcasing the pride and love we have for our languages and cultures. Come join us during the 3 days in Mapleleaf B room and make your buttons. You can create one from scratch, or we have many templates to choose from. While you're there, enjoy a snack, coffee and conversation.  

Day Three 2:45pm Sessions

Overcoming Barriers

   In this interactive workshop, Grace and Joyce will attempt to capture the barriers associated with non indigenous people that work in all the systems, bring in own language and culture into the workplace and how that effects the indigenous people in those systems. A brief introduction about Indigenous world view and the connection to the land will lay the foundation for an exercise about identifying barriers within the justice, CFS, health and education fields, what is inhibiting the progress, and how can we work together to overcome them.    


Ojibwe Language Games

 Join Dawnis Kennedy and Virginia Pateman others from the Manitoba Indigenous Cultural Education Centre (MICEC) as they debut their forthcoming publications and language learning games. The Boogidi Book is a fun and silly story that encourages empathy and supports young children learning personal pronouns, verb conjugation, simple sentences and exclamations. The Boogidi Game is an interactive card game that drills players on conjugation, allowing them to power up their Ojibwe exponentially. Players learn 100 sentences and 43 conjugation patterns about farting (these patterns also transform other verbs into 80 different sentences too). Gidinwewin and Kitininímowin provide the inspiration for these and several other language games currently in development at MICEC.  

Anishinaabemowin Cartoons

During this workshop, Westin will be discussing how he got inspired to translate and produce cartoons in our language, the story behind why he does it, as well as why it’s important. He will be showing quite a few clips of his current work, as well as some videos from when he started. He will discuss and show the process behind it, and how he started doing it. (From scratch!). He also has a recorded interview of his grandmother that he will show before facilitating a group activity!

Learning Language Through Ceremony

TBA

Button Making Workshop

  We are celebrating the Year of Indigenous Languages by showcasing the pride and love we have for our languages and cultures. Come join us during the 3 days in Mapleleaf B room and make your buttons. You can create one from scratch, or we have many templates to choose from. While you're there, enjoy a snack, coffee and conversation.